Monday, 18 January 2016

Interested in Alternative Metrics (Altmetrics) for evaluating your Research Performance?

Come to the PlumX presentation at 1.30 in the Library on the 26th Jan as part of the Faculty of Science and Engineering Publications Festival. They will also be available before and after their talk to take any questions you may have. PlumX provide analytics to help understand what has happened to your Research by looking at Impact beyond just Citations. They categorize metrics into five separate types: Usage (clicks, downloads, views, library holdings, video plays), Captures ( bookmarks, code forks, favorites, readers, watchers), Mentions (blog posts, comments, reviews, Wikipedia links), Social Media (+1s, likes, shares, tweets), and Citations (PubMed Central, Scopus, patents). For more details check out their Website at http://plumanalytics.com/learn/about-metrics/ The Library currently has a trial for the product and the Research Support Librarian (ciaran.quinn@nuim.ie) will be happy to demonstrate if required. The Library would also be interested in any feedback you may have on the value of such a product. If you are interested in seeing how this might look at an institutional level, the University of Pittsburgh have it up and running at https://plu.mx/pitt/g/

Friday, 15 January 2016

Altmetrics - a social revolution or just a hype?

Altmetrics - a social revolution or just a hype?: Is social impact measurement by altmetrics a valid method for governmental publications?

The traditional method of measuring the importance of scholarly publications is based on citation measurement in other scholarly journals.   But social impact can also be determined by figures about how publications are shared, downloaded, bookmarked, mentioned, liked, retweeted and cited on social platforms.  This data reveals more information about how the information and knowledge contained in the publication are being actively used.  For the academic world this type of measurement can be a valuable addition to well-established Journal Impact Factors (JIF).

Monday, 11 January 2016

Italy’s Research Evaluation Exercise | The Academic Executive Brief

Italy’s Research Evaluation Exercise | The Academic Executive Brief



The Italian National Agency for the Evaluation of the University and Research Systems (ANVUR) is starting a new project aimed at evaluating research outcomes published by Italian professors and researchers from 2011-2014. Overall, they expect over 130,000 publications to be evaluated.

The goal of the exercise is to evaluate the quality of the research conducted in Italian universities, and to rank these institutions and their departments in each of the 16 research areas that comprise all research activities in Italy. ANVUR has designated 400 assessors as the Group of Evaluation Experts (GEV) whose evaluation will significantly inform the distribution of public funds.

Thursday, 10 December 2015

What does Academia_edu’s success mean for Open Access? The data-driven world of search engines and social networking

What does Academia_edu’s success mean for Open Access? The data-driven world of search engines and social networking

With over 36 million visitors each month,
the massive popularity of Academia.edu is uncontested. But posting on
Academia.edu is far from being ethically and politically equivalent to
using an institutional open access repository, argues
Gary Hall.
Academia.edu’s financial rationale rests on exploiting the data flows
generated by the academics who use the platform. The open access
movement is in danger of being outflanked, if not rendered irrelevant by
centralised entities like Academia.edu who can capture, analyse and
exploit extremely large amounts of data.

Wednesday, 9 December 2015

The ResearchGate Score: a good example of a bad metric

The ResearchGate Score: a good example of a bad metric

According to ResearchGate, the academic social networking site,
their RG Score is “a new way to measure your scientific reputation”.
With such high aims,
Peter KrakerKaty Jordan and Elisabeth Lex
take a closer look at the opaque metric. By reverse engineering the
score, they find that a significant weight is linked to ‘impact points’ –
a similar metric to the widely discredited journal impact factor. Transparency
in metrics is the only way scholarly measures can be put into context
and the only way biases – which are inherent in all socially created
metrics – can be uncovered.

Wednesday, 2 December 2015

Network-based Citation Metrics: Eigenfactor vs. SJR

Network-based Citation Metrics: Eigenfactor vs. SJR

Is the influence of a journal best measured by the number of citations it attracts or by the citations it attracts from other influential journals?

Number of Female Researchers in Germany Has Increased By 25 Percent Over the Past Five Years

Number of Female Researchers in Germany Has Increased By 25 Percent Over the Past Five Years

Over the past five years, the number of female researchers in Germany has grown far more rapidly than that of male researchers. Female-only publications are the most internationally collaborative while mixed gender publications are more interdisciplinary than the mono-gender ones, highlights a new study by Elsevier.

Tuesday, 24 November 2015

QS University Rankings: Top 50 Under 50 2015

QS University Rankings: Top 50 Under 50 2015

 A ranking of the world’s top 50 universities under 50 years old, based on the latest QS World University Rankings®.
Use the interactive table to filter the results by country, or choose
from the options in the left-hand column to sort the institutions by
ranking and by age.

Friday, 20 November 2015

SEA scientific Open data

SEANOE

Seanoe (SEA scieNtific Open data Edition) is a publisher of scientific data in the field of marine sciences. It is operated by Sismer within the framework of the Pôle Océan.

Data published by SEANOE are available free. They can be used in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons license selected by the author of data. Seance contributes to Open Access / Open Science movement for a free access for everyone to all scientific data financed by public funds for the benefit of research.




Thursday, 19 November 2015

Standing on the shoulders of the Google giant: Sustainable discovery and Google Scholar's comprehensive coverage.

Standing on the shoulders of the Google giant: Sustainable discovery and Google Scholar's comprehensive coverage.

The 11th anniversary of Google Scholar passed yesterday. Max Kemman
provides an overview of the growth and impact of the platform and also
looks at why Google Scholar is virtually unrivaled. The scholarly
community might ask whether it is entirely desirable that Google plays
such an important role in the scholarly workflow. Not only does Google
Scholar have a known effect on discovery and citation of articles, it
could well be shaping academic writing and evaluation. 

Tuesday, 10 November 2015

It's official: Anil Potti faked cancer research data, say Feds

It's official: Anil Potti faked cancer research data, say Feds - Retraction Watch

Following five years of scrutiny, more than ten retractions, multiple settled lawsuits, and medical board reprimands,
we may finally have some resolution on the case of Anil Potti, the
once-rising cancer research star who resigned from Duke in 2010.

Impact of Social Sciences – altmetrics

Impact of Social Sciences – Search Results – altmetrics



The LSE  Impact Blog has a number of interesting articles looking at the background and potential for Altmetrics in Academia .